Five Places to See Flamenco in Seville

This blog post was originally posted on March 13, 2015, and was updated on February 9, 2017.

“Duende”  (duːˈɛndeɪ) noun: A quality of passion or inspiration, a spirit. It can be difficult to find authentic places to see flamenco in Seville.

We once read a book about a man who left everything he had in England and moved to Spain in pursuit of “flamenco.” He wanted to learn how to play the guitar and feel those intense emotions. In the process, he got in with a questionable crowd, lost most of his money, but found happiness.

Ahhh, the lure of flamenco. We’ll admit that we love it as well. The trouble is, it’s hard to know which shows are offering the real deal and which are going to be disappointing. For this reason, we’ve put together a list of places to see flamenco in Seville and have the best possible experience while doing so!

Want to see an authentic Andalusian Flamenco show? Here are Devour Seville's top five places to see Flamenco!

Photo credit: Veyis Polat, Text overlay: Devour Spain.

 

1. Casa de la Memoria

When someone asks us for a flamenco recommendation in Seville, we are quick to suggest one our favorites for an all-around experience, Casa de la Memoria. They have a nightly traditional flamenco show that incorporates a balance of guitar, singing, and dancing, performed in a small and intimate environment. If you happen to study guitar or dance, make sure check their schedule of master classes of flamenco. You can reserve online or beforehand at the venue. Booking is recommended, as is turning up early—this place is tiny!

Address: Calle Cuna, 6

2. Casa del Flamenco

Casa del Flamenco is a beautiful venue—the show takes place on the internal patio of a building nestled in the Santa Cruz neighborhood. As well as the fantastic location, the show is wonderful. Its main claim to fame is that it’s one of the only shows in Seville that doesn’t use some kind of microphones or amplification.

Expect to see all aspects of flamenco here—different styles of dancing, singing, and guitar, and be prepared for an energetic performance! Although it is recommended to arrive 15 minutes early to get a good seat, there aren’t really any bad seats in the house.

Address: Calle Ximénez de Enciso, 28

Got a flamenco craving? Join us on our evening tapas and flamenco tour! Take in one of Seville’s greatest traditions over some delicious tapas!

One of the best places to see flamenco in Seville!
The passion of flamenco in full force in Seville! – Photo Credit: Subodh Bharati

3. Casa de la Guitarra

Not only does Casa de la Guitarra offer an intimate nightly show, they have a collection of flamenco guitars which is worth having a look at! This space is very small and intimate, with only enough stage space for one dancer, but you can’t beat the vibe of the venue. Unlike many of our favorite flamenco places in Seville, here they will reserve seats!

Address: Calle Mesón del Moro, 12a

Casa de la Guitarra is one of the best places to see flamenco in Seville!
Singing and guitar stealing the show at Casa de la Guitarra

4. Museo del Baile Flamenco

Museo del Baile Flamenco is not your traditional museum—it’s an all-in-one experience! You can learn about flamenco dance, song, and guitar, as well as the history of the art. They have shows every evening alongside the museum, which you can book tickets for separately or all together. If you’re planning to be in Seville for a longer period of time, you can take classes to learn to dance, sing or play the guitar in the traditional flamenco style. It’s the perfect way to round of your flamenco experience! This is a great place to not only see flamenco in Seville but also to get a sense of the history and culture.

Address: Calle Manuel Rojas Marcos, 3

One of the best places to see flamenco in Seville!
Dancing, singing and guitar combine to make a wonderful performance in Seville’s flamenco venues!

5. Los Gallos

This spot is located in the heart of the Santa Cruz neighborhood (beautiful in and of itself). While the show is more expensive than others, this place is a flamenco institution in Seville. It’s been around since 1966 and at 1 hour and 45 minutes, the shows are longer than others. As the show is longer, they are able to showcase a wide variety of flamenco music and dance. However, Los Gallos prides itself on being traditional and keeping authenticity in their show. In fact, many flamenco greats came out of this “tablao” or traditional flamenco setting.

Address: Plaza Santa Cruz, 11

Seeing a flamenco show will make you want to learn too! These are some of the best places to see flamenco in Seville.
The energetic dancing is often one of the highlights of Seville’s flamenco shows! Photo Credit: Veyis Polat

To learn about the history behind this fabulous artform, as well as devour delicious tapas and local wines, be sure to join us on our Evening Tapas & Flamenco Tour

16 Comment

  1. inLove with Sevilla says: Reply

    I was in Sevilla just two weeks ago and as I understood it, there is quite the difference between Flamenco, Sevillanas, Rumbas, etc. although I can only tell the difference between the sevillanas and rumbas.

    I’ve never heard Flamenco at Anselma’s, just Sevillanas and Rumbas – which I actually prefer. I’ve been there twice (this time and in 2012). I went to see a show at casa de la memoria and it was very nice.

    Could you explain the difference between these 3 types of music/dance and if there are other typical dances, include them as well? I think a lot of people confuse Sevillanas and Flamenco the two – including myself! Thanks

    1. Lauren Aloise says: Reply

      Hello! My friend (and resident flamenco expert!) Yoly talks about what flamenco is and the difference between styles here http://theflamencoguide.com/what-is-flamenco/. As for whether sevillanas are flamenco or not, Yoly explains that the most popular theory is that it isn’t a flamenco style or “palo”, although a few flamenco experts would consider it flamenco. Rumbas are generally thought as a style within flamenco (i.e. a “palo”).

      The differences between the styles are musical. Each “palo” or style has a set of musical features in terms of rhythm, mode and lyrics. There’s a more in-depth explanation of this here http://www.compas-flamenco.com/en/palos.html. There are dozens of styles, and each has its own set of features. A great way to learn how to tell the different palos apart is to listen to lots of flamenco, always being aware of what the style of every song is.

  2. Patricia says: Reply

    can you please let me know which Flamenco show is best, not a tourist ‘trap’ and is closest to hotel Becquer C/ Reyes Católicos, 4
    41001 Sevilla Spain. I will greatly appreciate your information.
    thank you.

    -Patricia

    1. Cyra Alcock says: Reply

      Hi Patricia, definitely check out Casa de la Memoria. Their shows a real, authentic flamenco and it is about 10 minutes walk from Hotel Becquer. They have shows nightly and they are always great!

  3. Hi just wondering if the above places allow children? Ages 5 and 1. Thank you

    1. Lauren Aloise says: Reply

      Hello! Most do– however the show could be scary for young children, they are often very loud.

  4. Denise says: Reply

    We are staying in the Hotel Don Pedro, which flamenco venue would you recommend for a Tuesday night? We would prefer a show that isn’t just put on for tourists.

  5. Shirlley says: Reply

    Hola! We will be staying at the Gran Melia Colon and I wonder which show you would recommend that is convenient to our hotel. Casa De La Memoria or Casa de La Guitarra?

  6. […] not miss going to a flamenco performance in Seville! Usually there are two performances in the evening, costing between 15€ and 20€ depending where you […]

  7. Hector Luis Torres says: Reply

    I am interested in Modern Flamenco or Non Traditional, where I can see one?

    1. Hayley Salvo says: Reply

      Hi Hector,
      In Spanish, modern flamenco is called “flamenquito” or “flamenqueo.” Great places to catch locals in action include La Carbonería on Calle Levíes, 18 and Lola Cacerola on Calle Castilla, 36. We’d recommend drinking a strong coffee to help you stay up, because things won’t get lively until 1 am or later!

      1. Hector Luis Torres says: Reply

        Thanks a lot.

  8. Pinky Angelo says: Reply

    Hi, Pardon my ignorance about flamenco. My my family (with 3 children ages 26, 21 and 17) are heading to Seville next year and would like to watch flamenco in Barrio Sta Cruz or somewhere in Seville that is not too expensive. How much would it be to watch a flamenco show. Is it show plus food and drinks? Thank you.

    1. Hayley Salvo says: Reply

      Hi Pinky,
      There are lots of great places to catch Flamenco in Seville. Our favorite in the Santa Cruz neighbourhood is La Casa del Flamenco and tickets for run 18€ an hour-long show. If you’re looking to combine food, drink and a show, we’d love to have you join us on our Evening Tapas & Flamenco Tour!

  9. Melissa Luxmoore says: Reply

    Hi Guys. This was a great read and answered lots of questions for me except one 🙂

    I have a child with a disability and she will be travelling in her wheelchair. Do you know if any of these venues have wheelchair access and if so:
    1. Which would be our best option.
    2. Are there special contacts we need to make in order to make this happen or just purchase a ticket?
    3. or if none of these are accessible …do you know of any that are?

    thanks so much
    Melissa

    1. Jaimie Keating says: Reply

      Hi, Melissa. I do know that Casa del Flamenco is wheelchair accessible but it may be best to let them know in advance to ensure they have comfortable space that specific night as they can get very busy in high season. I hope this answers your questions and hopefully, you get to enjoy an amazing flamenco experience in the city! 🙂

Leave a Reply